Blog

AGM 2017

Our Annual General Meeting is coming up:

PSPS AGM 2017
Held at UBC Tapestry: 3338 Wesbrook Mall
November 6th
6:30 – 8:30pm

You can find the agenda and last year’s meeting minutes here:

Join us for tea and snacks at 6:00, and after our business has been concluded we will have an egaging talk by Tamsin Baker and Pamela Zevit from the South Coast Conservation Program. They will speak on Species at Risk and Diversity by Design.

Additionally, we need to reconcile our constitution and bylaws with the new BC Society’s Act. The BC Societies Act came into force November 28, 2016, and we are required to transition our constitution and bylaws to coincide with it. Over the past year, the board of directors has dutifully cross referenced our current constitution and bylaws with that of the new Act, and written a transition proposal. In doing so, bylaws have been added, changed, removed, reworded, reformatted and moved. Each bylaw is prefaced by an explanation as to how it has been impacted by this transition using the above terms in the report below. Some bylaws that were only relevant to our period of incorporation have been removed, while others have been changed to better reflect how the society runs in practice: duties of officers, etc.

At our AGM we will vote to submit this new constitution and bylaws document to the BC Societies Registry, and we will once again be in compliance with current societies legislation in the province.

 

Great Blue Heron

GREAT BLUE HERON

Ardea herodias

HABITAT:

Great Blue Herons build colonies in trees near the water.  Currently, there are no heron colonies in Pacific Spirit Regional Park, but there were for many years and we hope they will return to nest in the park again someday.  You can see herons feeding in several areas of the park, including the foreshore, streams and wetlands.

DIET:

Herons eat fish and amphibians from shallow water.  At low tide you can see the herons patiently waiting for a little fish to swim past so it can quickly snatch it up.  They can also be seen visiting the Camosun Bog and Beaver Pond in hopes of finding a delicious frog or some tadpoles to feed on.

BEHAVIOUR:

The Great Blue Heron is the largest and heaviest heron in the world.  They have a deep call that sounds like a trumpeting fraaahnk!  They often can be heard at night when they are more active.

Photo: Linda Mueller

Barred Owl

BARRED OWL

Strix varia

HABITAT:

Barred owls live in forests with tall trees and an open understory.

DIET:

Small mammals are the favourite food for the Barred owl.  They can find mice, voles and squirrels to eat in the park.

BEHAVIOUR:

The Barred owl likes to live alone and is difficult to see in the park because it come out at night to hunt.  You may be able to hear them calling in the daytime.  Their call sounds like who-cooks-for-you.  

Photo: Linda Mueller

Pacific Treefrog

PACIFIC TREEFROG

Pseudacris regilla

HABITAT:

Pacific Treefrogs lay their eggs in the Beaver pond, Camosun bog and Spanish Creek nursery pond, but you can hear them singing their song in early spring throughout the park.

DIET:

Pacific Treefrogs love to eat insects, but they also eat their own skill after they shed it!

BEHAVIOUR:

The Pacific Treefrog is the smallest frog in the park, but it is the most common and noisy.  During mating season one male starts to sing and many other will join in.  These frogs are often green, but they can also be red, brown and even blue!

Photo: Linda Mueller

Garter Snake

GARTER SNAKE

Thamnophis sirtalis

HABITAT:

The Garter Snakes in Pacific Spirit Regional Park live near aquatic or wet areas of the park, including the Camosun Bog.  They live in hibernacula with snakes of other species.

DIET:

They feed upon earthworms, small fish, larvae and amphibians.

BEHAVIOUR:

They will slither into the water when the snakes are startled and can dive right to the bottom of the bog pond to hide.  They also hide under the boardwalk or under rocks and logs.  The Garter Snake can strike and bite when threatened, but are not poisonous.  They do emit a foul-smelling musk from their gland vent and release feces and excrement in order to escape.

 

 

Shore Pine

SHORE PINE

Pinus contorta

BARK:

Scaly, or deeply furrowed into plates, dark brown to blackish

LEAVES:

Needles in pairs, oven curved or twisted, deep green, 2-7 cm long

CONES:

Pollen cones are small, reddish-green in clusters at the tips

Seed cones are egg-shaped and slightly curved, scales are stiff and brown with a sharp prickle at the tip, 3-5 cm long

ECOLOGY:

Grows in and around the Camosun Bog, since it can tolerate low-nutrient wet areas

Western Hemlock

WESTERN HEMLOCK

Tsuga heterophylla

BARK:

Mature bark is reddish-brown, scaly, thick and furrowed.

LEAVES:

Needles are yellowish green on their upper surface and whitish with 2 thin lines of stomata on their lower surface. They are short, flat and blunt, irregularly spaced and of unequal length: needles on the same twig can be 0.5-2 cm long. They are arranged spirally around twigs, but are twisted at the base so they appear to extend horizontally in two tiers.

CONES:

Pollen cones are small and numerous.

Seed cones are also numerous and approximately 2 cm long and oblong. They are purplish-green when young and become light brown when mature.

TIPS:

Western hemlock are distinguished by their unequal needle length and the feathery, flat appearance of their branches. They have a noticeably drooping leader.

 

Douglas Fir

DOUGLAS FIR

Pseudotsuga menziesii 

BARK:

Younger bark is smooth and grey-brown. Mature bark is very thick, fluted, ridged, rough, and dark brown.

LEAVES:

Needles are 2-3 cm long, deep yellowish-green, and flat with pointed tips. They are arranged spirally around twigs and have one groove on their upper surfaces and two lines of stomata on their lower surfaces. Buds are sharply pointed.

CONES:

Pollen cones are small, yellow to reddish.

TIPS:

Douglas-fir can be distinguished by the “mice” hiding in their cones. The long, three-pointed bracts look like the hind legs and tail of a mouse. Their thick bark is sometimes described as being corky-like and helps protect them from moderate surface fires.

 

Western Red Cedar

WESTERN RED CEDAR

Thuja plicata

BARK:

Bark is grey to reddish brown, ridged and fissured. It tears off in long strips.

LEAVES:

Leaves are scale-like, glossy, and yellowish-green. They are opposite, overlapping and pressed to the stem in a way that looks like a flattened braid.

CONES:

Pollen cones are minute (tiny), numerous and red.

Seed cones are about 1 cm long, egg-shaped and in loose clusters. Young seed cones are green. Mature green cones become brown, woody and turn upwards.

TIPS:

The branches of Western redcedar trees are J-shaped: they spread or droop and then turn upwards towards the tips. The bases of mature trees are often fluted and buttressed.

 

 

Grand fir

GRAND FIR

Abies grandis

BARK:

The bark is greyish-brown. Younger bark is smooth with resin blisters. The bark of older trees becomes ridged and then scaly.

LEAVES:

Needles are 2-4 cm, dark green and flat with rounded, notched tips. (However, needles on branches with cones may be pointed.) They have a groove on their upper surfaces and two lines of stomata on their lower surfaces. They are usually arranged in two rows spreading horizontally from the branch so the upper and lower sides of the branches can be seen easily.

CONES:

Pollen cones are yellowish.

Seed cones are 5-10 cm long, yellowish-green to green, cylindrical shaped and erect. They are usually found higher up in the tree.

Photo: André-Philippe Picard